IMPORTANT: Per accedir als fitxer de subversion: http://acacha.org/svn (sense password). Poc a poc s'aniran migrant els enllaços. Encara però funciona el subversion de la farga però no se sap fins quan... (usuari: prova i la paraula de pas 123456)

 There are two kinds of cryptography in this world: cryptography that will stop your kid sister from reading your files, and cryptography that will stop major governments from reading your files...

bcrypt is a key derivation function for passwords designed by Niels Provos and David Mazières, based on the Blowfish cipher, and presented at USENIX in 1999.[1] Besides incorporating a salt to protect against rainbow table 1 attacks, bcrypt is an adaptive function: over time, the iteration count can be increased to make it slower, so it remains resistant to brute-force search attacks even with increasing computation power.

The bcrypt function is the default password hash algorithm for BSD and many other systems. The prefix "$2a$" or "2y" in a hash string in a shadow password file indicates that hash string is a bcrypt hash in modular crypt format.[2] The rest of the hash string includes the cost parameter, a 128-bit salt (base-64 encoded as 22 characters), and the 192-bit[dubious – discuss] hash value (base-64 encoded as 31 characters).[3]

Blowfish is notable among block ciphers for its expensive key setup phase. It starts off with subkeys in a standard state, then uses this state to perform a block encryption using part of the key, and uses the result of that encryption (which is more accurately a hashing) to replace some of the subkeys. Then it uses this modified state to encrypt another part of the key, and uses the result to replace more of the subkeys. It proceeds in this fashion, using a progressively modified state to hash the key and replace bits of state, until all subkeys have been set.

Provos and Mazières took advantage of this, and took it further. They developed a new key setup algorithm for Blowfish, dubbing the resulting cipher "Eksblowfish" ("expensive key schedule Blowfish"). The key setup begins with a modified form of the standard Blowfish key setup, in which both the salt and password are used to set all subkeys. There are then a number of rounds in which the standard Blowfish keying algorithm is applied, using alternately the salt and the password as the key, each round starting with the subkey state from the previous round. Cryptotheoretically, this is no stronger than the standard Blowfish key schedule, but the number of rekeying rounds is configurable; this process can therefore be made arbitrarily slow, which helps deter brute-force attacks upon the hash or salt.

The iteration count is a power of two, which is an input to the algorithm. The number is encoded in the textual result.

There are implementations of bcrypt for Ruby, Python, C, C#, Perl, PHP, Java and other languages.

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